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Research Associate

Shaq Vayda

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The future is already here — it's just not very evenly distributed.

Biography

Shaq joins the Lux team with a passion for technology and a desire to invest in people, helping turn their vision for a better world into reality. Specifically, he is excited by areas such as the commercialization of space, embedded systems, and the future of agriculture and food. At Lux, Shaq assists the team’s efforts across market research and company due diligence initiatives.

Previously, Shaq worked at EY-Parthenon in San Francisco, where he advised software companies and their investors across market diligence and value creation initiatives. Shaq started his career in management consulting, and previously spent time in the aerospace and defense sector.

Growing up on the Space Coast of Florida, Shaq earned a Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Florida. He is passionate about pursuing his lifelong goal of becoming an astronaut and envisions a near future with space tourism.

What are the most exciting innovations of the past decade?

The abstraction away from hardware and software infrastructure, giving rise to entirely new products and services where companies focus on customer experiences and not capital expenditures.

Which scientist or technologist has had the greatest impact on the world?

Norman Borlaug – a relatively unknown American agronomist who contributed to increases in agricultural production known as the Green Revolution. He’s credited with saving over a billion people worldwide from starvation, through a development of high-yielding grains and expanding irrigation infrastructure.

What was your first paying job?

Selling in-game items on Runescape for money at the age of 12.

Key Facts

  • Built a spacecraft in high school to photograph the curvature of Earth

  • Hasn’t missed watching a Florida Gators football game since the age of 8

The future is already here — it's just not very evenly distributed. William Gibson